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Ridgway borough getting in position to apply for impact fee grants

February 21, 2012

Photo by Heather Cherry – From left, Guillermo Udarbe, Ridgway Mayor; Nina Stolburg, Council President; and Martin Schuller, Borough Manager. The Ridgway Borough Council listened to Main Street Manager Michelle Bogacki deliver her monthly report during the February meeting.

The Ridgway Borough Council discussed the possible impact fee grants in the near future and the status of a local downtown restaurant Monday night during their month meeting.
Main Street Manager Michelle Bogacki presented her monthly report which included the status of the Ling Ling Chinese Restaurant in downtown Ridgway, a subject that councilman Ralph Dussia brought up.
“The Chinese restaurant is making progress,” Bogacki said. “There have been some inspection code issues.”
Mayor Guillermo Udarbe elaborated on the issue.
“The Chinese people don’t understand the code and have asked for my contractor to go in there,” Udarbe said. “There seems to be some miscommunication.”
Other Main Street business Bogacki reported was the relocation of Grace Notary to a space on Main Street and the expansion of the State Farm office space. Bogacki said she is active in monitoring the economic and environmental impact of the Marcellus Shale with the Marcellus Shale Task Force Team. Also, two projects funded by the façade grant have been completed: a sign for Hello Beautiful and a sign and lighting for Aiello’s Café.
Environmental Manager Paul McCurdy reported he is working on being in the best position to receive grant monies from the impact fee recently passed under the Marcellus Shale Legislation.
“We don’t know how the money will be distributed,” McCurdy said. “There are things that make you more likely to get a grant, and we want to place ourselves so we are in the best position.”
Under the proposal of the Marcellus Shale Legislation, 60 percent of the revenue raised from the fee would go to local governments impacted by drilling. Of that share, 37 percent would go to host municipalities, 36 percent to host counties and 27 percent to other municipalities in host counties. The money is designed to be used for local services, emergency preparedness, roads, bridges and other infrastructure projects.

Pick up a copy of the Tuesday, Feb. 21, 2012 edition of The Ridgway Record for more.

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